Posts Tagged ‘how to be more powerful’

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(Getting coached on my squat by the legendary Powerlifter, Ed Coan)

No one wants to get “no repped”in a meet or on a test; solid technique will solve that problem.

Isn’t there more to having good technique than that?

Why do coaches constantly stress technique anyhow?

First, let me clarify that, good coaches do and  lousy coaches don’t.

Good technique will definitely help you get stronger and help prevent injuries.

Here’s a few reasons why:

  • improved structural integrity
  • full range of motion is achieved
  • coordination is enhanced
  • speed increases
  • better mind/body connection
  • more effective use of available energy
  • body control/stability gets better

Excellent technique coupled with smart programming will help both the seasoned strength athlete and the novice lifter get better overall.

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Legendary Powerlifter, Ed Coan (left) and myself (right) at Coach Coan’s Powerlifting Seminar.

Here at the Cave we continuously strive to bring you the very best training we possibly can. We learn from the best coaches/athletes  around so we can help you achieve your goals.

When you see this sign, drive through to the back parking lot!

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Combining basic strength-building exercises is a good alternative for circuit training. We did one at our Iron Brotherhood Mens Weightlifting Club yesterday.

The longer I live and lift, the more important the mental aide of training becomes.

Of course, the mental side of training is vitally important in other types of training, also.

I was first introduced to mental aspect of training during my early years of martial arts practice. It has stayed with me ever since I started training as a teenager.

Though I do not practice martial arts as I did back then, the mindset is now applied to lifting.

If you train with or watch serious lifters in action, they have their own styles of how they attack their training.

Some are loud and openly aggressive while others move in silently for the kill.

Either way, they are 100% focused and determined to get that lift. The ones before are history and the next one doesn’t matter yet.

I remember the first time I heard Dru Patrick talk about his training, at Bud Jeffries & Logan Christopher’s Super Human Training Workshop.

He said when he goes to the gym, he goes to kill.

More recently, at Ed Coan’s Powerlifting Seminar, he stressed going their with the intent to destroy.

No matter what your lifting ritual is, make each individual  rep count. It is the only one that matters!

Life in the midst of the human race can be challenging, even on a good day.

A lot of that has to do with how we see other people. How we treat others in the gym and in life  often depends on the filter we are viewing them through.

It is very common for people to rant and rage against this group or that group, especially on the Internet. If we see people only as a member of a certain group, it kind of anesthetizes us from the insults and hurt we might heap on them.

Think about it, do you see people only through a filters like these?

  • religion
  • race
  • politics
  • sexuality
  • appearance
  • age

There are certainly more filters used by people that affect how they treat others.

One of the best ways to get rid of the filters is to get to know real people in real life.

Yes, that means actually talking with them face to face in person.

What a concept!

Notice I said talking with them not at them. This includes actively listening to them, which is generally taken as a sign of respect.

At my gym, I have trained a wide variety of people; many of which have very different world views than my own. It is important to show respect and treat people like you want to be treated (kind of a Jesus idea isn’t it?)

Normally I won’t turn someone away except for them being lazy or too arrogant to learn.

Those are their own bad choices. I will not be an enabler to them by allowing them to bring those attitudes into my gym.

Over training can occur, of course, however many people do not train intensely enough or often enough to warrant undue fear of it.

You can hear all kinds of differing opinions on it, like anything else on the Internet, just keep in mind it is a possibility.

I am more inclined to think that people are not getting enough recovery time and quality sleep. The strongest people I know all stress the importance of those two things and they validate that by what they are actually  able to do.

Yes, proper nutrition is a vital part of the equation, but I want to emphasize the other aspects here.

In this chaotic world we live in, stress is at an all time high. It definitely can detract from

both the quality and quantity of your recovery and sleep.

Social media addiction, watching  TV (especially the news), playing video games late into the night all hinder your recovery & sleep. There are more things that could be added to this list, but you get the picture.

Serious athletes/lifters know how to dial in their recovery/sleep to maximize their gains.

If you want to take your training to the next level, take a good honest look at your recovery and sleep habits. Change whatever you need to in order to be the best you can be!

The heat index was 112 degrees today in southwest Florida, and nobody cared if there was no air conditioning. We were there to learn from the incredible Ed Coan. Most of the people who came were extremely strong already, but they knew the value of expert coaching, they knew they could get even stronger.

I was very humbled to learning alongside some very accomplished Powerlifters, like Billy “The Tank” Tutko,  at this event.

The cool thing was, no one came across as rude or arrogant today. I was the oldest one there and one the smallest. Everyone was supportive and encouraging.

I learned a lot there and added over ten pounds to my deadlift PR. It was a very productive day!

PRs were being broken all over then place as Coach Coan worked one-on-one with each person there. His vast experience and knowledge let him pinpoint problem areas rapidly and teach how to fix each one.

Coach Coan really focused on the mental side of lifting as well as getting your whole body as strong as possible.

This very cool training event was held in a place that many would think was very unusual for Powerlifting, a CrossFit gym. However, this is no ordinary Crossfit gym.

CrossFit Havoc is run by Jim Denofa, and his lovely wife, Natasha.  Jim was a Powerlifter before he started CrossFit and he is good at both.

The take-home points are

  • never stop learning
  • never put limits on what you can do
  • train with Ed Coan if you ever get the chance