Archive for the ‘physical culturalists’ Category

Life is unpredictable, at best, you never know what you might be facing that day when you get up in the morning. I believe that our training should build a well-rounded readiness for any situation.

If someone were to ask how we train at the Cave, for instance, “Do you do Powerlifting or Olympic Weightlifting?”, the answer is yes. It’s not one or the other.

Whether it’s CrossFit or Strongman or Underground Strength, or PowerX, the answer is yes, once again.

Do we prefer barbells, dumbbells,  kettlebells, sandbags, kegs, stones, logs, bands, chains, sleds, or bodyweight? The answer is still yes.

Bruce Lee said, “If you always put limit on everything you do, physical or anything else. It will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them”.

 

 

 

 

One of the statements that caught my attention when I first found CrossFit in 2004 was that nature punishes the specialist.

Over the years I have learned from numerous coaches and athletes who are very accomplished in their respective sports, whether it is Powerlifting, Strongman, Underground, Olympic Weightlifting, CrossFit and more.

In the overall scheme of things we need to make a distinction between training just for general fitness and training for a competitive sport.

Being able to lift, run, swim, climb, jump, carry, fight, etc. are all part of a generalized approach to fitness.

This approach can be extremely useful in daily life, especially as the world gets crazier, it seems, every day. You never know what you might encounter, and this is a way to be better prepared.

However, if you a competitor, it is vital to be a specialist in your sport. The things that are great for generalized fitness will not be helpful, for example, in getting a big total in Powerlifting.

It is important to know why you are training and what your goals are before you begin your training journey.

If you are already training, and decide to change from generalized fitness to a competitive lifting sport, you will need to dial in your training to fit that new goal.

Make smart choices and follow through on them.

Summer is just about here and so is the next “fat panic” across America.

This occurs   around New Years also. It is very predictable.

The unreasonable fear of looking bad in a bathing suit suddenly hits those who have neglected their health and fitness all the rest of the year.

Here’s the main problem, though:

  • slick marketers know this and prey on the people caught up in the panic
  • every slick scheme imaginable will be promoted through the media, Internet, etc.
  • gullible, uninformed people will buy almost anything to get slimmer fast

You can help prevent your family and friends from getting suckered by  the con artists out there by making them aware of this. Some still won’t listen, but some might.

Remember:

  • No one can safely get a lean attractive body in just a few days or even weeks
  • Rapid weight loss scams are dangerous
  • Losing weight fast with a crazy diet usually entails losing muscle mass and other things your body needs
  • It takes good program design and a solid work ethic to get fit and lean

The people who will look great in a bathing suit his summer are already in excellent shape, they bare not in panic mode. They trained all winter. There are NO shortcuts or magic formulas!

My approach overall is strength and fitness are the main priorities

However, train the right way for strength and fitness and the improved looks are just a byproduct of that.

Don’t let the people you care about get suckered!

 

The first time I heard tendon strength mentioned as a focal point of training was back in 2004 at a Russian Systema school here in my city. The instructor, Saulius “Sonny” Puzikas, had served in Special Operations (Spetsnaz) before the collapse of the Soviet Union.

He knew what mattered in the real world when. it came to training, and I took his advice.

Tendon strengthening is part of our training here at the Cave.

Since that time I learned many others  focus on tendon strength, especially those who do Strongman training. While other strength sports also realize the importance of it; I have learned the most from Strongmen.

The latest issue of Milo has an excellent article on this subject by Dr. William Crawford.

He stresses building a solid  foundation of full ROM movements, then adding heavy partial lifts and carries. We use these often in our training, in fact, I increased their use after having some tendon injuries. I have not had any other injuries since that time.

Tendons do  not heal as fast as muscles, it is wise to protect them.

Strong tendons won’t make you bullet-proof, but they will definitely help you train safer and get much stronger.