Archive for the ‘safe training’ Category

general warm up (10 minutes)

Adex club long cycle swipes x 30 reps

Adex mace launches x 20 reps

tuck jumps x 15 reps

plyo push ups x 10 reps

medicine ball chest passes x 10 reps

specific warm up (5 minutes)

bench press set up and light reps

strength (20 minutes)

bench press x 4/4/4/4/4/4 reps

conditioning/accessory work (2 rounds)

dumbbell bench press x 15 reps

double dumbbell rows x 15 reps

general warm up (10 minutes)

kettlebell swings x 30 reps

Adex club pull overs x 30 reps

Zercher sandbag squats x 10 reps

Strongman log cleans x 10 reps

specific warm up (5 minutes)

triple tire flip and rear drag** set up and light practice

strength (20 minutes)

triple tire flip and rear drag** x 1/1/1/1

**drag tire backwards to your starting point

conditioning/accessory work (2 rounds)

lateral sledge hammer strikes x 10/10 reps

tire pummeling x 10 reps

general warm up (10 minutes)

Adex club side cleans x 30 reps

Adex club front clean/squat/pull over x 20 reps

resistance band archer pulls x 30/30 reps

medicine ball chest passes x 10 reps

specific warm up (5 minutes)

sled push set up and light practice

strength (20 minutes)

heavy sled push x 50 feet x 1/1/1/1/1

conditioning/accessory work (2 rounds)

weighted push ups x 10 reps

dumbbell pull overs x 10 reps

kettlebell goblet squats x 10 reps

thae8nfbufAs we wrap up Movember (men’s health awareness month) I wanted to caution guys who are overweight not to begin their weight loss program with running.

I am not saying they should never run, just get your body more prepared for it by cleaning up your nutrition and doing other types of exercise first.

Joint problems can result if you are not careful!

It is great when a person decides to finally get in shape, but don’t let your enthusiasm or desperation cause you more health problems.

So after enjoying your Thanksgiving, don’t go crazy on exercise. Get solid training advice from someone actually has a good amount of experience.

Forget what your buddies say or late night infomercials. Also forget about the photo-shopped guys in fitness magazines and their “amazing secrets to 6-pack abs”.

Do your homework and then make smart choices!

 

 

 

People are confused about many things these days, every thing from politics to gender to eating habits and so forth.

One thing I have noticed as a coach is people are confused about what it takes to improve various aspects of their health and fitness.

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A person came to my gym “to get strong” so they said, yet they didn’t understand what it takes to get that way. They thought getting all sweaty and collapsing on the floor out of breath was the path to getting strong.

As we worked through our warm up, technique practice, and on into our work sets they just didn’t get it

We work to establish a solid foundation of basics with correct technique before we allow people to lift heavy. It should be simple to understand, but for many it isn’t.

Some people really are chasing the experience rather than the results.

They think if they are not “crawling out the door” at the end, then they didn’t really workout.

We spend a lot of days doing heavy sets of 1 to 5 reps, which to someone who wants to feel like they just did 100 burpees it just doesn’t match their expectations.

However incorrect their expectations are, that is not how we build strength at the Cave.

Once a person has good technique on the basic lifts, we ramp it up.

We also add in a variety of training tools that are not commonly used in many gyms. This requires learning more basics. You might be good at barbell lifts, but try a heavy keg, sandbag, or stone and see what happens.

They just want it to be fast and furious, to feel the rush, and their heart feeling like it will burst out of their chest.

That is all fine if they want to build muscle endurance, aerobic capacity, etc.

Metcons definitely have their purpose in overall conditioning, people just shouldn’t confuse the different types of training and program design.

 

One of the statements that caught my attention when I first found CrossFit in 2004 was that nature punishes the specialist.

Over the years I have learned from numerous coaches and athletes who are very accomplished in their respective sports, whether it is Powerlifting, Strongman, Underground, Olympic Weightlifting, CrossFit and more.

In the overall scheme of things we need to make a distinction between training just for general fitness and training for a competitive sport.

Being able to lift, run, swim, climb, jump, carry, fight, etc. are all part of a generalized approach to fitness.

This approach can be extremely useful in daily life, especially as the world gets crazier, it seems, every day. You never know what you might encounter, and this is a way to be better prepared.

However, if you a competitor, it is vital to be a specialist in your sport. The things that are great for generalized fitness will not be helpful, for example, in getting a big total in Powerlifting.

It is important to know why you are training and what your goals are before you begin your training journey.

If you are already training, and decide to change from generalized fitness to a competitive lifting sport, you will need to dial in your training to fit that new goal.

Make smart choices and follow through on them.

Over training can occur, of course, however many people do not train intensely enough or often enough to warrant undue fear of it.

You can hear all kinds of differing opinions on it, like anything else on the Internet, just keep in mind it is a possibility.

I am more inclined to think that people are not getting enough recovery time and quality sleep. The strongest people I know all stress the importance of those two things and they validate that by what they are actually  able to do.

Yes, proper nutrition is a vital part of the equation, but I want to emphasize the other aspects here.

In this chaotic world we live in, stress is at an all time high. It definitely can detract from

both the quality and quantity of your recovery and sleep.

Social media addiction, watching  TV (especially the news), playing video games late into the night all hinder your recovery & sleep. There are more things that could be added to this list, but you get the picture.

Serious athletes/lifters know how to dial in their recovery/sleep to maximize their gains.

If you want to take your training to the next level, take a good honest look at your recovery and sleep habits. Change whatever you need to in order to be the best you can be!