Posts Tagged ‘build muscle’

general warm up (10 minutes)

resistance band archer pulls x 30/30 reps

alternating diagonal pull a parts x 30

Adex arc 360’s x 40 reps

recline bar rows x 15 reps

specific warm up (5 minutes)

strict dumbbell rows set up and light practice

strength (20 minutes)

strict dumbbell rows x 4/4-4/4-4/4-4/4-4/4-4/4 reps

conditioning/accessory work (2 rounds)

Woodall curls x 10/10 reps

weight stack push downs x 10 reps

This young man has trained with me for a little over 5 months. He was super skinny when he started but has put on 15lb so far and is much stronger now.

general warm up (10 minutes)

Adex club side cleans x 50 reps

Adex club barbarian pull overs x 30 reps

sandbag BTN push press x 10 reps

bodyweight squats x 25 reps

push ups x 25 reps

specific warm up (5 minutes)

bench press set up and light reps

strength (20 minutes)

bench press x 4/4/4/4/4/4 reps

conditioning/accessory work (3 rounds)

French  press x 10 reps

dumbbell curls x 10 reps

One of my favorite training tools is the sled.

You can work with a heavy load and not directly load the spine.

Hand-over-hand sled pulls build strength from Frank DiMeo on Vimeo.


(Getting coached on my squat by the legendary Powerlifter, Ed Coan)

No one wants to get “no repped”in a meet or on a test; solid technique will solve that problem.

Isn’t there more to having good technique than that?

Why do coaches constantly stress technique anyhow?

First, let me clarify that, good coaches do and  lousy coaches don’t.

Good technique will definitely help you get stronger and help prevent injuries.

Here’s a few reasons why:

  • improved structural integrity
  • full range of motion is achieved
  • coordination is enhanced
  • speed increases
  • better mind/body connection
  • more effective use of available energy
  • body control/stability gets better

Excellent technique coupled with smart programming will help both the seasoned strength athlete and the novice lifter get better overall.

Life is unpredictable, at best, you never know what you might be facing that day when you get up in the morning. I believe that our training should build a well-rounded readiness for any situation.

If someone were to ask how we train at the Cave, for instance, “Do you do Powerlifting or Olympic Weightlifting?”, the answer is yes. It’s not one or the other.

Whether it’s CrossFit or Strongman or Underground Strength, or PowerX, the answer is yes, once again.

Do we prefer barbells, dumbbells,  kettlebells, sandbags, kegs, stones, logs, bands, chains, sleds, or bodyweight? The answer is still yes.

Bruce Lee said, “If you always put limit on everything you do, physical or anything else. It will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them”.





One of the statements that caught my attention when I first found CrossFit in 2004 was that nature punishes the specialist.

Over the years I have learned from numerous coaches and athletes who are very accomplished in their respective sports, whether it is Powerlifting, Strongman, Underground, Olympic Weightlifting, CrossFit and more.

In the overall scheme of things we need to make a distinction between training just for general fitness and training for a competitive sport.

Being able to lift, run, swim, climb, jump, carry, fight, etc. are all part of a generalized approach to fitness.

This approach can be extremely useful in daily life, especially as the world gets crazier, it seems, every day. You never know what you might encounter, and this is a way to be better prepared.

However, if you a competitor, it is vital to be a specialist in your sport. The things that are great for generalized fitness will not be helpful, for example, in getting a big total in Powerlifting.

It is important to know why you are training and what your goals are before you begin your training journey.

If you are already training, and decide to change from generalized fitness to a competitive lifting sport, you will need to dial in your training to fit that new goal.

Make smart choices and follow through on them.