Archive for the ‘#program design’ Category

Anyone who has been to a legit certification knows that you get plenty of information in a short period of time. That is great if you can take action on it when you get back.

Obtaining facts and concepts is good, but knowing how to use the information effectively is way better.

Here’s a few photos of how I applied what I recently learned at the Vintage Strength Mace & Club Certification in Miami. This the first class after the certification.

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Over the years, I have pursued some of the top certifications available, all of them with  world-wide communities of trainers.

Yes, I did learn a lot and it was worth the effort and expense.

However, as my training got more dialed in I found less and less relevance in what was required to maintain those certifications. They simply did not match what I was doing or where I was headed.

So, one by one, I let them expire.

My path is much different now, and much better then when I began years ago.

I refuse to be enslaved to any system!

Keep your mind free from peer pressure and the need to be liked or accepted to have value in training and in life. You can go much further without all that baggage.

 

I have learned over the years how important it is to make your training match you.

Having used different training systems, I have kept what helped me most and ditched the rest.

I decided one day that I don’t want to feel like I got hit by a truck every time I train.

Be bold enough to not follow the crowd.

Decide what works best for you and do that. Don’t get sucked into the trap of doing the coolest thing around.

If a training method is beating you up, it is no good, period.

Change what you need to change or find a different system.

Remember in Dr. Fred Hatfiled’s 7 laws of training, the first one listed is the law of individual differences.

We are not all alike and will respond differently to training than other people do.

The Internet is flooded with all types of training information., and some of it is good.

You can find all kinds of videos on just about any kind of exercise you can think of.

However, having access to all this information doesn’t mean a person will know the best ways to use it.

Just trying to copy someone else doing a lift is one thing, but actually knowing how to  train to get the maximum results for that lift is a whole different story.

Many can copy stuff, but few know how to effectively design a training program.

Program with basic movements, primarily, and use some variety in accessory work as needed. Implement change when it  is needed, not for entertaining your clients or trying to fool them into thinking you know what you are doing if you really don’t.

Remember, getting results for a brand new, untrained  person is easy; but getting ongoing results for a more experienced lifter is more difficult.

Think carefully when writing your training program, don’t just make stuff up and hope for the best.

 

 

 

That would depend on if you had access to weights or not.

If you do have weights, stick with the barbell.

You can load a barbell heavier than dumbbells, kettlebells, etc.

My choices would be

(Kendrick Ferris, Jr.)

  • squats
  • deadlifts
  • bench press
  • press
  • cleans

If barbells are not available, use odd objects, for the basic lifts mentioned above.

Odd object lifts  are way harder than an equivalent amount on a barbell lift.

(Martin Jancsics )

Modify the movements to fit the type of object you are lifting.

The most basic of all exercises are done with your own bodyweight.

  • squats
  • push ups
  • pull ups/chin ups
  • lunges
  • dips
  • planks

(Will Deleon)

There are many ways that your life can depend on how fit and strong you are, whether it is an emergency situation, a physical confrontation, or just daily living. Sports and competitions are important, but not as important as the quality of your life overall. You have to be able to move your own body or external objects as the situation requires it day by day.

You don’t need a bunch of different exercises, but whatever you choose, always give 100% effort and focus to it.

Be consistent and watch what happens!

uchYou train hard, eat clean, get enough sleep so you should be doing great, right?

Not always! Let’s look a little closer at why performance is not improving.

  • Myth #1–I can take several  weeks off and come back as strong as before. Usually upon returning to the gym I hear people say things  like, “I can’t believe how much strength I lost.” No kidding, what did you expect? You might train hard while you are there, you’re just not there enough.

 

  • Myth #2-I can do other types of training on what should be my rest days and still excel in my lifting. Rest days are there for a reason, and it is not to play other intense sports between your lifting sessions. Some light active recovery is fine, but if you over do it, you will pay the price in decreased performance in your lifting.

Without consistent training and sufficient rest you will never be as good as you could have been.