Archive for the ‘#program design’ Category

The Internet is flooded with all types of training information., and some of it is good.

You can find all kinds of videos on just about any kind of exercise you can think of.

However, having access to all this information doesn’t mean a person will know the best ways to use it.

Just trying to copy someone else doing a lift is one thing, but actually knowing how to  train to get the maximum results for that lift is a whole different story.

Many can copy stuff, but few know how to effectively design a training program.

Program with basic movements, primarily, and use some variety in accessory work as needed. Implement change when it  is needed, not for entertaining your clients or trying to fool them into thinking you know what you are doing if you really don’t.

Remember, getting results for a brand new, untrained  person is easy; but getting ongoing results for a more experienced lifter is more difficult.

Think carefully when writing your training program, don’t just make stuff up and hope for the best.

 

 

 

That would depend on if you had access to weights or not.

If you do have weights, stick with the barbell.

You can load a barbell heavier than dumbbells, kettlebells, etc.

My choices would be

(Kendrick Ferris, Jr.)

  • squats
  • deadlifts
  • bench press
  • press
  • cleans

If barbells are not available, use odd objects, for the basic lifts mentioned above.

Odd object lifts  are way harder than an equivalent amount on a barbell lift.

(Martin Jancsics )

Modify the movements to fit the type of object you are lifting.

The most basic of all exercises are done with your own bodyweight.

  • squats
  • push ups
  • pull ups/chin ups
  • lunges
  • dips
  • planks

(Will Deleon)

There are many ways that your life can depend on how fit and strong you are, whether it is an emergency situation, a physical confrontation, or just daily living. Sports and competitions are important, but not as important as the quality of your life overall. You have to be able to move your own body or external objects as the situation requires it day by day.

You don’t need a bunch of different exercises, but whatever you choose, always give 100% effort and focus to it.

Be consistent and watch what happens!

uchYou train hard, eat clean, get enough sleep so you should be doing great, right?

Not always! Let’s look a little closer at why performance is not improving.

  • Myth #1–I can take several  weeks off and come back as strong as before. Usually upon returning to the gym I hear people say things  like, “I can’t believe how much strength I lost.” No kidding, what did you expect? You might train hard while you are there, you’re just not there enough.

 

  • Myth #2-I can do other types of training on what should be my rest days and still excel in my lifting. Rest days are there for a reason, and it is not to play other intense sports between your lifting sessions. Some light active recovery is fine, but if you over do it, you will pay the price in decreased performance in your lifting.

Without consistent training and sufficient rest you will never be as good as you could have been.

 

general warm up (10 minutes)

mountain climbers x 100 feet

recline rope climbs x 5

drop, rock, & push x 10 reps (learned this from New Warrior Training)

alternating Adex mace barbarian lunges x 20 reps

Adex club 2 hand mills x 30 reps

specific warm up (5 minutes)

sled push set up and light practice

strength (20  minutes)

heavy sled push x 50 feet x 1/1/1/1/1

conditioning/accessory work (2 rounds)

lockout sit ups x 10 reps

isometric keg hold x max. hold time

Voluntary ignorance is a choice, a very bad choice; yet, people make that bad choice every day.

Usually it is driven by ego, which is in turn driven by fear.

If you “freeze” and refuse to adapt, you get swallowed up in the backwash of those who were aware of the changes and took action, as they sweep right past you.

There are many example of this in life, but I will look at one glaring example, the world of fitness.

Let me differentiate between learning and implementing valid changes as opposed to chasing the next “shiny object” or fad.

People need to do their own research (social media is not research) and seek out the best training methods available. They should find the most qualified coaches around and learn from them.

It’s been said over the years that pride comes before a fall, and it is true.

Don’t let your ego get in the way of your progress!

SteelClub_MaceTrainingFinal