Archive for the ‘#program design’ Category

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general warm up (10 minutes)

resistance band pull a parts x 100 reps

push ups x 25 reps

dislocates x 10 reps

Adex club front cleans x 20 reps

Burgener drills

specific warm up (5 minutes)

clean & jerk set up and light practice

strength (20 minutes)

clean & jerk x 2/2/2/2/2/2 reps

conditioning/accessory work (2 rounds)

dumbbell push press x 10/10 reps

Bulgarian squats x 10/10 reps



Anyone who has been to a legit certification knows that you get plenty of information in a short period of time. That is great if you can take action on it when you get back.

Obtaining facts and concepts is good, but knowing how to use the information effectively is way better.

Here’s a few photos of how I applied what I recently learned at the Vintage Strength Mace & Club Certification in Miami. This the first class after the certification.

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Over the years, I have pursued some of the top certifications available, all of them with  world-wide communities of trainers.

Yes, I did learn a lot and it was worth the effort and expense.

However, as my training got more dialed in I found less and less relevance in what was required to maintain those certifications. They simply did not match what I was doing or where I was headed.

So, one by one, I let them expire.

My path is much different now, and much better then when I began years ago.

I refuse to be enslaved to any system!

Keep your mind free from peer pressure and the need to be liked or accepted to have value in training and in life. You can go much further without all that baggage.


I have learned over the years how important it is to make your training match you.

Having used different training systems, I have kept what helped me most and ditched the rest.

I decided one day that I don’t want to feel like I got hit by a truck every time I train.

Be bold enough to not follow the crowd.

Decide what works best for you and do that. Don’t get sucked into the trap of doing the coolest thing around.

If a training method is beating you up, it is no good, period.

Change what you need to change or find a different system.

Remember in Dr. Fred Hatfiled’s 7 laws of training, the first one listed is the law of individual differences.

We are not all alike and will respond differently to training than other people do.

The Internet is flooded with all types of training information., and some of it is good.

You can find all kinds of videos on just about any kind of exercise you can think of.

However, having access to all this information doesn’t mean a person will know the best ways to use it.

Just trying to copy someone else doing a lift is one thing, but actually knowing how to  train to get the maximum results for that lift is a whole different story.

Many can copy stuff, but few know how to effectively design a training program.

Program with basic movements, primarily, and use some variety in accessory work as needed. Implement change when it  is needed, not for entertaining your clients or trying to fool them into thinking you know what you are doing if you really don’t.

Remember, getting results for a brand new, untrained  person is easy; but getting ongoing results for a more experienced lifter is more difficult.

Think carefully when writing your training program, don’t just make stuff up and hope for the best.