Posts Tagged ‘bodyweight’

Lunch atop a Skyscraper, 1932images4c2dea89ef3ac2da6791d933866058b2

There are few today who really work hard physically. There are some exceptions of course, like our military, construction workers, farmers, lumber jacks, block masons, dry wall installers, OT’s, PT’s, First Responders, etc.

Many people only exercise their thumbs from texting or playing video games. They sit all day, that is far from actually  doing physical work.

So, next Monday, while much of the country is pretending they worked so hard they need an extra day off, we will be training extra hard at the Cave.

Hard Labor Day has become a yearly tradition, so come and celebrate with us!

 

 

 

Life is unpredictable, at best, you never know what you might be facing that day when you get up in the morning. I believe that our training should build a well-rounded readiness for any situation.

If someone were to ask how we train at the Cave, for instance, “Do you do Powerlifting or Olympic Weightlifting?”, the answer is yes. It’s not one or the other.

Whether it’s CrossFit or Strongman or Underground Strength, or PowerX, the answer is yes, once again.

Do we prefer barbells, dumbbells,  kettlebells, sandbags, kegs, stones, logs, bands, chains, sleds, or bodyweight? The answer is still yes.

Bruce Lee said, “If you always put limit on everything you do, physical or anything else. It will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them”.

 

 

 

 

One of the statements that caught my attention when I first found CrossFit in 2004 was that nature punishes the specialist.

Over the years I have learned from numerous coaches and athletes who are very accomplished in their respective sports, whether it is Powerlifting, Strongman, Underground, Olympic Weightlifting, CrossFit and more.

In the overall scheme of things we need to make a distinction between training just for general fitness and training for a competitive sport.

Being able to lift, run, swim, climb, jump, carry, fight, etc. are all part of a generalized approach to fitness.

This approach can be extremely useful in daily life, especially as the world gets crazier, it seems, every day. You never know what you might encounter, and this is a way to be better prepared.

However, if you a competitor, it is vital to be a specialist in your sport. The things that are great for generalized fitness will not be helpful, for example, in getting a big total in Powerlifting.

It is important to know why you are training and what your goals are before you begin your training journey.

If you are already training, and decide to change from generalized fitness to a competitive lifting sport, you will need to dial in your training to fit that new goal.

Make smart choices and follow through on them.

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Legendary Powerlifter, Ed Coan (left) and myself (right) at Coach Coan’s Powerlifting Seminar.

Here at the Cave we continuously strive to bring you the very best training we possibly can. We learn from the best coaches/athletes  around so we can help you achieve your goals.

When you see this sign, drive through to the back parking lot!

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Let me be very blunt, if you cannot get up out of a chair or off the toilet by yourself, you are no longer physically independent. Talk to anyone who works in health care, especially with the elderly and you will see what I mean.

The best way to avoid that as you get older is to squat on a regular basis.

In many cultures, squatting is a normal every day thing. If they are not standing up doing something, they are probably squatting doing some kind of work, eating a meal, or just talking with friends.

How many people in Western cultures could do that? Not too many I am sure.

In these countries there are way too many conveniences and it makes the people weak  and lazy.

So, it is squats to the rescue!

Any person who does Powerlifting, Olympic Weightlifting, Strongman, CrossFit, or Underground Strength Training knows the value of the squat.

Any reasonably person healthy person can squat.

There are many variations of the squat, so regardless of age you can do some type of the squat.

Some people will pay attention to this and take action, and others will just blow it off.

You can squat and  keep your physical independence or you can skip it and just set yourself up for life in a nursing home.

The choice is yours alone, so choose wisely!

 

 

Life in the midst of the human race can be challenging, even on a good day.

A lot of that has to do with how we see other people. How we treat others in the gym and in life  often depends on the filter we are viewing them through.

It is very common for people to rant and rage against this group or that group, especially on the Internet. If we see people only as a member of a certain group, it kind of anesthetizes us from the insults and hurt we might heap on them.

Think about it, do you see people only through a filters like these?

  • religion
  • race
  • politics
  • sexuality
  • appearance
  • age

There are certainly more filters used by people that affect how they treat others.

One of the best ways to get rid of the filters is to get to know real people in real life.

Yes, that means actually talking with them face to face in person.

What a concept!

Notice I said talking with them not at them. This includes actively listening to them, which is generally taken as a sign of respect.

At my gym, I have trained a wide variety of people; many of which have very different world views than my own. It is important to show respect and treat people like you want to be treated (kind of a Jesus idea isn’t it?)

Normally I won’t turn someone away except for them being lazy or too arrogant to learn.

Those are their own bad choices. I will not be an enabler to them by allowing them to bring those attitudes into my gym.

Over training can occur, of course, however many people do not train intensely enough or often enough to warrant undue fear of it.

You can hear all kinds of differing opinions on it, like anything else on the Internet, just keep in mind it is a possibility.

I am more inclined to think that people are not getting enough recovery time and quality sleep. The strongest people I know all stress the importance of those two things and they validate that by what they are actually  able to do.

Yes, proper nutrition is a vital part of the equation, but I want to emphasize the other aspects here.

In this chaotic world we live in, stress is at an all time high. It definitely can detract from

both the quality and quantity of your recovery and sleep.

Social media addiction, watching  TV (especially the news), playing video games late into the night all hinder your recovery & sleep. There are more things that could be added to this list, but you get the picture.

Serious athletes/lifters know how to dial in their recovery/sleep to maximize their gains.

If you want to take your training to the next level, take a good honest look at your recovery and sleep habits. Change whatever you need to in order to be the best you can be!