Posts Tagged ‘learning’

Workshop Template

A measured amount of confidence is a good thing but an over-sized ego is not.
It takes a lot of maturity and wisdom, along with a solid work ethic to make progress over the long haul.
If you are training alongside someone who can pull 100lb more than you, that doesn’t automatically mean you should be able to do it or that you are entitled to that level of strength at this time.
You just haven’t earned it yet.

When you have put in the same amount of work as that person, you will be a lot closer to doing similar things. However, he still might always out lift you so just deal with it.

Trying to duplicate a superior lifter’s accomplishments when you haven’t “paid your dues” is a sure way to get injured. Be humble enough to be coached and consistently work hard on what he tells you.

I heard it said a while ago, “That when all else fails, do what your coach told you to do in the first place.”

It’s not rocket science:

  • Work on your basic lifts
  • eat plenty of quality protein, fats, & carbs
  • sleep 7 to 9 hours/night
  • stay hydrated
  • handle life stress well

Don’t waste your time looking for shortcuts, there aren’t any.

 

 

20170413_180348Every quarter we have our strength & work capacity tests Currently there are 5 barbell tests and 2 bodyweight tests.

As a coach, I analyze all the results for each person individually and for the entire group.

This gives me a clear picture of what problem areas we need to work on for the next three months and how to adjust our program design.

If there is the same  problem affecting all the people we test, then the coach (me) needs to do a better job overall and address that issue for the whole group.

If there is a problem with one person in a particular area, then I will tailor specific training for that person to bring up that weak spot.

This help me improve my coaching and it helps them make more progress. I hear Coach Rik Brown talk about that same thing almost every week during his online mace coaching program. He says we help him become a better coach.

I heed his advice!

 

The Cave is definitely NOT for everyone!

I only work with “the dedicated, coachable few”.

  • be humble
  • listen well
  • work hard
  • be consistent

People who miss training for 2 weeks or more without notifying the coach are out for good, except for emergencies, military deployments, etc.

If any of the following apply to you, then the Cave is not for you–

  • you are a wuss
  • you are easily offended
  • you are lazy
  • you are arrogant
  • you are an excuse-maker
  • you are a whiner
  • you are a drama queen
  • you think you are entitled to something
  • you think you should get a better price

It’s just that simple! It’s not rocket science.

How many times have your heard the phrase, “Listen to your body!”?

It is so common, yet is ignored by many people.

I have learned it hard way, probably like  many others.

One particular thing I have noticed is the human body body will send you a warning, prior to a torn muscle or tendon. Usually it is a “twinge” or slight pain, during a lift. It is not that noticeable, unless you are really paying attention.

The problem comes when you think it’s not too bad and decide to push through and finish the set. So part way through the next rep BAM! You drop the bar and grab the injured part.

You are done, you won’t be lifting for a while.

So why did it happen?

There are numerous reasons:

  • you are just so focused nothing will stop you from finishing
  • you are so egotistical you think you are invincible
  • you are new to training
  • you have been training incorrectly

The point is, injuries are avoidable to a certain degree.

Good technique is a big plus when it come to preventing injuries, but even people with good technique get injured sometimes.

Listen more closely to your body next time!

I have always liked venturing into new, or relatively unexplored, territory in training

That has been a habit of mine for decades. For example when I was heavily involved in  martial arts, our dojo was doing full-contact fighting years before it became popular, and televised, of course.

Did we have all the answers?

Certainly not! We found the answers often times in painful, but memorable ways.

I still remember getting knocked out in a match, and learned a lot from that experience.

You can’t get that type of knowledge from books, videos, or downloads.

You have to live it!

Later I got involved with CrossFit when it was almost completely unknown. There were only four CF gyms in the entire world when I first found them in late 2004.

We added in  Powerlifting, Strongman, and Underground  training along the way.

Last year we started learning about maces & clubs. Almost no one I new was training with them outside of California.

I refuse to follow the herd! Doing what everyone else is raving about is not for me.

 

 

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Once you stop learning, you are done.

When you think you have arrived, you are fooling yourself.

Any time you think you can’t be knocked out of first place, you are doomed.

You get the point, I hope.

One thing I find to be very prevalent in the fitness world is a refusal to venture beyond what is commonly done in  most gyms.

While I definitely believe in the importance of basic exercises with barbells, dumbbells, etc.

There is a small percentage of coaches/trainers who will seek out and experiment “hands on” with things most people aren’t even aware of. These are the ones that are not handcuffed by what others think is cool or effective. They go find out for themselves.

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This young man came all the way from Lighthouse Point (near Fort Lauderdale) to learn today, while people 10 minutes from our gym did not.

Why?

Because he is hungry to learn!

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People with very demanding schedules, like this Firefighter and others, made the time to come and learn.

If you have shackled yourself with the immunity to learn, remember you hold the key to unlock them.

Don’t limit your self to the status quo, the familiar, or the comfort zone!